Synthesis is the act of creating something new from multiple existing entities. Synthesis of research, then, is creating a new idea from existing ideas. Synthesis of research is not a single innate skill. Rather, it is a process learned through time and practice. At the doctoral level, writing is a continual process of revision as learners improve skills and build subject matter expertise.In Topic 5, you submitted a Synthesis Paper and received both feedback from your instructor and a grade for your work. In this assignment, you will expand upon your original paper with additional research from additional sources, incorporate feedback from your instructor, and provide a reflection section addressing your revision process.General Requirements:Use the following to ensure successful completion of the assignment:Locate the Synthesis Paper you completed in Topic 5 and the feedback provided by your instructor. Locate and download the Revised Synthesis Paper Supplemental Articles List This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. Doctoral learners are required to use APA style for their writing assignments. The APA Style Guide is located in the Student Success Center. Refer to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association for specific guidelines related to doctoral-level writing. The manual contains essential information on manuscript structure and content, clear and concise writing, and academic grammar and usage. You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. Refer to the LopesWrite Technical Support articles for assistance.Directions:Locate the Synthesis Paper you completed in Topic 5. Using the feedback provided by your instructor and information from the two additional articles you selected, write an Enhanced Synthesis Paper with Reflection (1,250-1,800 words). Include the following in your paper:A Reflection (250-300 words) in which you discuss your revision process and how you incorporated your instructor’s feedback into the revised version. Like the format of an abstract, this section will receive its own page following the title page and preceding the Introduction. An introduction that provides context for the topic. This includes presenting a clear thesis statement. Support for your identified themes with evidence from each original article. You must also incorporate additional support from sources included on the supplemental articles list. Synthesize your discussion of the topic to support your thesis. A conclusion that demonstrates support of your thesis statement, brief summary of the main points from your two themes, and recommendations for future research
Synthesis is the act of creating something new from multiple existing entities. Synthesis of research, then, is creating a new idea from existing ideas. Synthesis of research is not a single innate sk
College of Doctoral Studies RES-815 Revised Synthesis Paper Supplemental Articles Use these articles for additional academic support in the Topic 7 Revised Synthesis Paper. Ames, C., Berman, R., & Casteel, A. (2018). A preliminary examination of doctoral student retention factors in private online workspaces. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 13, 79-106. doi:10.28945/3958 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=136926905&site=eds-live&scope=site Bainbridge, C., Maul, J., & McClendon, C. (2019). Ten strategic points: A framework for doctoral dissertations students to conceptualize their research design in a doctoral residency program. Journal of Instructional Research, 8(2), 10-21. https://cirt.gcu.edu/jir/documents/2019_v82/ten_strategic_points_a_framework_for_doctoral_dissertations_students_to_conceptualizepdf~1? Chakraverty, D. (2020). Ph.D. student experiences with the impostor phenomenon in STEM. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 15, 159-179. doi:10.28945/4513 http://ijds.org/Volume15/IJDSv15p159-179Chakraverty6025.pdf Emmioglu, E., McAlpine, L., & Amundsen, C. (2017). Doctoral students’ experience of feeling (or not) like an academic. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 12, 73-90. doi:10.28945/3727 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=124163714&site=ehost-live&scope=site&custid=s8333196&groupid=main&profile=ehost McClendon, C., Neugebauer, R. M., & King, A. (2017). Grit, growth mindset, and deliberate practice in online learning. Journal of Instructional Research, 6, 8-17. doi:10.9743/jir.2017.2 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1153307&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=s8333196&groupid=main&profile=eds1 Noonan, S. J. (2015). Doctoral pedagogy in stage one: Forming a scholarly identity. International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation, 10, 2-28. https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1060946&site=eds-live&scope=site Rogers-Shaw, C., Carr-Chellman, D., (2018). Developing care and socio-emotional learning in first year doctoral students: Building capacity for success. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 13, 233-253. doi:10.28945/4064 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=136926912&site=eds-live&scope=site Skakni, I. (2018). Doctoral studies as an initiatory trial: Expected and taken-for-granted practices that impede Ph.D. students’ progress. Teaching in Higher Education, 23(8), 927-944. doi:10.1080/13562517.2018.1449742 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=133105269&site=eds-live&scope=site Wisker, G. (2015). Developing doctoral authors: Engaging with theoretical perspectives through the literature review. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 52(1), 64-74. doi:10.1080/14703297.2014.981841 https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=100551812&site=eds-live&scope=site
Synthesis is the act of creating something new from multiple existing entities. Synthesis of research, then, is creating a new idea from existing ideas. Synthesis of research is not a single innate sk
Running head: ROLE OF A RESEARCHER 0 Role of a Researcher Brandi Williams Grand Canyon University: RES-811 Dr. Charles Banaszewski September 8, 2021 Role of a Researcher Doctoral students enter various programs with already defined academic identities, but crisis occurs as the learning journey becomes intense. They experience the trouble of integrating their multiple roles developed over the years into a single doctoral identity. Some experience doubts early on and may fall off the wagon if their imposter syndrome, inherent with higher learning, is not addressed. According to Inouye & McAlpine (2017), self-confidence in doctoral students determines their ability to develop and contribute to the field. The traditional role of a researcher in an academic institution is to collect and interpret data that align with established goals and procedures. In fulfilling this role, the researcher must be aware of their interests and biases to maintain objectivity. Hence, the most crucial dimension in doctoral student experience is identity development. Forming an identity involves applying past academic experiences, feedback, and emotions in a specific field of study. As scholars understand the internal and external shaping forces, they integrate them into their doctoral identity journey. Identity development helps integrate multiple identities allowing students to narrow down a direction to take in their programs. An immense array of emerging fields exists, and ongoing research is increasing the overall area of knowledge in existing fields. All this information could cloud a student’s mind, making specialization a daunting decision. However, mentorship eases this burden by providing students with direction and focus. Instructor feedback is also essential in directing their thinking process and requires a favorable response from students to be effective. Doctoral students overcome the scholarly identity crisis by accepting it is a common challenge in their studies and positively applying their mentors’ feedback in their research thinking process. Identity development Forming a scholarly identity involves embracing an academic identity crisis early on as this helps doctoral students fit into their higher learning programs quickly. Doctoral students are referred to as scholars even though they have not yet processed what this means or what is expected. The major challenge confronting doctoral students is the ambiguity of the term “scholar” (Coffman et al., 2016). Consequently, they struggle to integrate their multiple roles and identities on the journey to becoming scholars. Schools also contribute to the doctoral identity crisis by introducing rules and structures that define practitioner-scholars. Postgraduate students find themselves confined in categories predefined by institutional regulatory power. Scholars continue to wrestle with disorienting dilemmas after their degree completion because of their multiple identities and validation struggles. Doctoral students face educational identity issues because of the multiple roles they adopt throughout learning. They struggle to integrate their experiences into a single doctoral identity because of the confinement to the liminal doctorate process (Coffman et al., 2016). Higher education is organized into obstacles that students have to overcome, with each challenge requiring the student to change and adapt. Educational programs influence individual’s perception of themselves, and this perception is altered every time students experience change creating an identity crisis (Coffman et al., 2016). The curriculum in schools is set and bound by time. Hence, students need to constantly acquire new identities and discard old one as they move through the prescribed requirements. Doctoral programs provide a perfect place for socialization, but it is not accessible if students take full-online classes (Garcia & Yao, 2019). Their connection process is not as smooth as for those learning in person. Therefore, they experience significant disconnections from the onset, making their identity journey more frustrating. Isolation from peers and instructors can create a strong imposter syndrome due to a lack of constant assurance. Students require assurance that they are on the right path from instructors and peers as a source of motivation. Socialization during training also increases confidence in abilities as they can experience failure and success with their peers. A thesis is required for the establishment of scholarly identity, but the process of creating one is a difficult task. Students find themselves overwhelmed by numerous revisions needed to refine this central task. Some develop adverse reactions to feedback, which affect the development process (Inouye & McAlpine, 2017). The process of creating a thesis requires constant consultation between students and instructors. Hence, to develop a solid scholarly identity, students have to be receptive to criticism to improve in their respective fields. Mentorship Doctoral students need their instructors’ guidance through their self-discovery journey and doctoral identity development. Mentorship is central to scholarly identity. Doctoral students need guidance from their supervisors to overcome challenges that seem beyond their control. The instructors’ feedback plays a huge role in shaping graduates’ educational journey and identity. As much as students want to be independent, they need to learn from other experiences to manage obstacles encountered. An effective mentoring method is being part of a social group that offers support and insight into complex subjects. Mentorship groups provide a safe space for reflection and professional growth. Coffman et al. (2016) recommend Community of Practice (CoP) as the best concept for developing doctoral students’ identity. It is a practice-based program that creates a situation where learners develop by co-creating personal knowledge in social constructs. However, online students are disproportionally affected since they cannot access the benefits of a mentorship group such as a Community of Practice. Consequently, they tend to lag when it comes to the development of scholarly identity. Hence, a first-year seminar course is necessary for online doctoral students because of the socialization capability possessed by other students (Garcia & Yao, 2019). Also, instructor-student interaction provides a stable platform for sharing among students and improves communication. Instructors assist in the intellectual development of students by exposing them to new literature and theoretical frameworks that guide the creation of a thesis. The doctoral process is affected mainly by instructors’ participation in the thesis creation. According to Inouye & McAlpine (2017), students who engage their tutors more actively and positively integrate their feedback are more likely to succeed than their colleagues. However, feedback is only effective if students respond effectively to criticism. Conclusion Students that refine their research thinking process according to the changes recommended by instructors and knowledge from various programs successfully develop their doctoral identity. Identity development involves doctoral students combining all of their educational experiences into a single doctoral identity. Instructors can assist in this process through mentorship; by providing relevant feedback on areas that require improvement and guiding educational development through consultations. Further study should focus on rates of success between online and in-person programs. The study will aim to determine if exposure to mentorship and socialization impacts the success rate in a class. Another area of research would be to examine how different decision-making processes lead to successful or unsuccessful thesis development. References Coffman, K., Putman, P., Adkisson, A., Kriner, B., & Monaghan, C. (2016). Waiting for the expert to arrive: Using a community of practice to develop the scholarly identity of doctoral students. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 28(1), 30-37. Retrieved from http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/ Garcia, C. E., & Yao, C. W. (2019). The role of a first-year online seminar in higher education doctoral students’ scholarly development. The Internet and Higher Education, 42, 44-52. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2019.04.002  Inouye, K. S., & McAlpine, L. (2017). Developing scholarly identity: Variation in agentive responses to supervisor feedback. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 14(2), 3-19. Retrieved from https://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/
Synthesis is the act of creating something new from multiple existing entities. Synthesis of research, then, is creating a new idea from existing ideas. Synthesis of research is not a single innate sk
Running head: ROLE OF A RESEARCHER 0 Role of a Researcher Brandi Williams Grand Canyon University: RES-811 Dr. Charles Banaszewski September 8, 2021 Role of a Researcher Doctoral students enter various programs with already defined academic identities, but crisis occurs as the learning journey becomes intense. They experience the trouble of integrating their multiple roles developed over the years into a single doctoral identity. Some experience doubts early on and may fall off the wagon if their imposter syndrome, inherent with higher learning, is not addressed. According to Inouye & McAlpine (2017), self-confidence in doctoral students determines their ability to develop and contribute to the field. The traditional role of a researcher in an academic institution is to collect and interpret data that align with established goals and procedures. In fulfilling this role, the researcher must be aware of their interests and biases to maintain objectivity. Hence, the most crucial dimension in doctoral student experience is identity development. Forming an identity involves applying past academic experiences, feedback, and emotions in a specific field of study . As scholars understand the internal and external shaping forces, they integrate them into their doctoral identity journey. Identity development helps integrate multiple identities allowing students to narrow down a direction to take in their programs. An immense array of emerging fields exists, and ongoing research is increasing the overall area of knowledge in existing fields. All this information could cloud a student’s mind, making specialization a daunting decision. However, mentorship eases this burden by providing students with direction and focus. Instructor feedback is also essential in directing their thinking process and requires a favorable response from students to be effective. Doctoral students overcome the scholarly identity crisis by accepting it is a common challenge in their studies and positively applying their mentors’ feedback in their research thinking process . Identity d evelopment Forming a scholarly identity involves embracing an academic identity crisis early on as this helps doctoral students fit into their higher learning programs quickly. Doctoral students are referred to as scholars even though they have not yet processed what this means or what is expected. The major challenge confronting doctoral students is the ambiguity of the term “ scholar ” (Coffman et al., 2016). Consequently, they struggle to integrate their multiple roles and identities on the journey to becoming scholars. Schools also contribute to the doctoral identity crisis by introducing rules and structures that define practitioner- scholars . Postgraduate students find themselves confined in categories predefined by institutional regulatory power. Scholars continue to wrestle with disorienting dilemmas after their degree completion because of their multiple identities and validation struggles . Doctoral students face educational identity issues because of the multiple roles they adopt throughout learning. They struggle to integrate their experiences into a single doctoral identity because of the confinement to the liminal doctorate process (Coffman et al., 2016). Higher education is organized into obstacles that students have to overcome, with each challenge requiring the student to change and adapt. Educational programs influence individual’s perception of themselves, and this perception is altered every time students experience change creating an identity crisis (Coffman et al., 2016). The curriculum in schools is set and bound by time. Hence, students need to constantly acquire new identities and discard old one as they move through the prescribed requirements. Doctoral programs provide a perfect place for socialization, but it is not accessible if students take full-online classes (Garcia & Yao, 2019). Their connection process is not as smooth as for those learning in person. Therefore, they experience significant disconnections from the onset, making their identity journey more frustrating. Isolation from peers and instructors can create a strong imposter syndrome due to a lack of constant assurance. Students require assurance that they are on the right path from instructors and peers as a source of motivation. Socialization during training also increases confidence in abilities as they can experience failure and success with their peers. A thesis is required for the establishment of scholarly identity, but the process of creating one is a difficult task. Students find themselves overwhelmed by numerous revisions needed to refine this central task. Some develop adverse reactions to feedback, which affect the development process (Inouye & McAlpine, 2017). The process of creating a thesis requires constant consultation between students and instructors. Hence, to develop a solid scholarly identity, students have to be receptive to criticism to improve in their respective fields. Mentorship Doctoral students need their instructors’ guidance through their self-discovery journey and doctoral identity development . Mentorship is central to scholarly identity. Doctoral students need guidance from their supervisors to overcome challenges that seem beyond their control. The instructors’ feedback plays a huge role in shaping graduates’ educational journey and identity. As much as students want to be independent, they need to learn from other experiences to manage obstacles encountered . An effective mentoring method is being part of a social group that offers support and insight into complex subjects. Mentorship groups provide a safe space for reflection and professional growth. Coffman et al. (2016) recommend Community of Practice (CoP) as the best concept for developing doctoral students’ identity. It is a practice-based program that creates a situation where learners develop by co-creating personal knowledge in social constructs. However, online students are disproportionally affected since they cannot access the benefits of a mentorship group such as a Community of Practice. Consequently, they tend to lag when it comes to the development of scholarly identity. Hence, a first-year seminar course is necessary for online doctoral students because of the socialization capability possessed by other students (Garcia & Yao, 2019). Also, instructor-student interaction provides a stable platform for sharing among students and improves communication. Instructors assist in the intellectual development of students by exposing them to new literature and theoretical frameworks that guide the creation of a thesis. The doctoral process is affected mainly by instructors’ participation in the thesis creation. According to Inouye & McAlpine (2017), students who engage their tutors more actively and positively integrate their feedback are more likely to succeed than their colleagues. However, feedback is only effective if students respond effectively to criticism. Conclusion Students that refine their research thinking process according to the changes recommended by instructors and knowledge from various programs successfully develop their doctoral identity. Identity development involves doctoral students combining all of their educational experiences into a single doctoral identity. Instructors can assist in this process through mentorship; by providing relevant feedback on areas that require improvement and guiding educational development through consultations. Further study should focus on rates of success between online and in-person programs. The study will aim to determine if exposure to mentorship and socialization impacts the success rate in a class. Another area of research would be to examine how different decision-making processes lead to successful or unsuccessful thesis development . References Coffman, K., Putman, P., Adkisson, A., Kriner, B., & Monaghan, C. (2016). Waiting for the expert to arrive: Using a community of practice to develop the scholarly identity of doctoral students. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 28(1), 30-37. Retrieved from http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/ Garcia, C. E., & Yao, C. W. (2019). The role of a first-year online seminar in higher education doctoral students’ scholarly development. The Internet and Higher Education, 42, 44-52. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2019.04.002  Inouye, K. S., & McAlpine, L. (2017). Developing scholarly identity: Variation in agentive responses to supervisor feedback. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 14(2), 3-19. Retrieved from https://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/




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