Please use the template for this project I have provided before for the final submission; Also, please use your peer’s feedback effectively to build up your final lesson plan.Notice: Unicheck is used for checking plagiarism; If I have found a majority of your work are copied from other resources, I will contact you at the first time)Format: Drop your assignment in a Word Document. Use the Time New Roman Font 12 in the main textInstructor feedbackYou are using the examples/past tense frames to rebuild your lesson. That will be fine. But please revise the designed activities based on your students’ need and provide more example sentences that fits to your classroom setting.
Please use the template for this project I have provided before for the final submission; Also, please use your peer’s feedback effectively to build up your final lesson plan. Notice: Unicheck is used
Running head: AN ANNOTATED LESSON PLAN 1 An annotated lesson Content area/developmental focus: Comparative grammar Age/Grade of the learners: 1st Grade and in the Middle-school. Domain for concentration: ESL-ELA class The length of the lesson: 55 minutes Goals of the lesson Guiding the ESL-ELA class through the process of comparative grammar. Enabling the learners to demonstrate the ability for growth and learning in grammar. Objectives of the lesson The learners should develop the ability for recognizing and also verbalizing as well as understanding the aspect of comparing grammar especially under different language utilizations. The other objective will be guiding the learners so that they might become innovative and also creative as well as learning the essential grammar tips especially comparing grammar. Materials required A paper and a pencil Language comparison, grammar focus of instruction and relevance establishment Focusing on the order of words in relation to the descriptive adjectives. As an example, in Arabic, descriptive adjectives are always placed in a sentence especially after a noun while in English, descriptive adjectives are always placed before the nouns. Therefore, the differences in the placement of the descriptive adjectives is likely to lead to confusion especially when it comes to Arabic-speaking learners that are trying to learn English. The lesson will then focus on teaching the learners about the right placement of the descriptive adjectives in a sentence especially in English. The other essential undertaking involved in this case is choosing a grammatical element either in English or in other language and then comparing it against a second language of choice.Specifically, this can be done by taking a grammatical element in Arabic and then comparing it against the English language. In this comparison, essential similarities as well as differences will be obtained across the two languages as they relate to meaning, usage and even form. Potential errors or sources of errors for the target language will also be obtained. The description of how errors and sources of errors concerning the grammatical element will also be described and this will be done especially in the classroom and also the society as well as the manner it has challenged oneself. Introductory statement regarding the language task The aspect of subject-auxiliary inversion will be the greatest focus as far as the language task is concerned. The auxiliary, “can” will be utilized as an individual tries to work cooperatively with a partner. Additionally, the learners will be informed that they are going to engage in the task of comparative grammar as this will be an essential way of preparing the mindset of the learners. Specifically, the aspect will be narrowed down by informing the students that they were to engage in the exercise of adjectives placement in a sentence since they differ when it comes to Arabic and English languages and the Arabic-speakers might experience such a confusion especially when it comes to the placement of adjectives in a sentence. Under the introductory aspect, learners are required to write narratives as per the Educational department of Michigan and this undertaking needs to be done especially to the learners in a middle school. As a result, the learners are required to be at a point of using a descriptive language so that they might be giventhe ability of visualizing their stories. In this case, sensory details will be used to add depth and also interest especially when it comes to the aspect of writing. The undertaking is in line with the feeling that the learners will even become richer after they add adjectives to their sensory details and this richness will be realized in the English language. Therefore, the undertaking will be given a priority. Review of the terminology Three key things will be considered under the aspect of the review of terminology. They include input and under this aspect, the essential things considered will be either written or spoken language. The second aspect considered under this category is the aspect of output and this will be language that has been heard or has been read. The third aspect of consideration under the review of terminology will be enhanced input and this will entail either written or spoken language and especially the one that has been modified to ensure or make information highly understandable for the learners and all other individuals interested in this case. Standards and outcomes The essential standards that will be considered in this case will be RL.1.3 and this entails describing characters, settings as well as the key events within a story through the use of details. The other standard will be RL.1.7 and it involves using illustrations as well as details within a story for describing characters and events as well as settings. There is also a standard like SL.1.1 that entails participating in the collaborative conversations within the diverse group of individuals and partners concerning texts and topics with the peers and also adults not only in the small but also in larger groups. The other essential standards include SL.1.2, WIDA-ELD.1 and WIDA-ELD.2. Among the essential outcomes is that the learners will be capable of describing a character or a setting from a video’s portion using pictures or words. The other outcome is that the learners will develop the ability for orally using subject-auxiliary inversion when asking questions and also responding correctly to questions while using the inversion. Instructional practice Under the instructional practice, two essential aspects will be considered and they include structured input activity. Regarding this activity, learners will listen to a certain paragraph concerning what another individual did in the course of the week or over a weekend. Past tenses will be used in the narrative and afterward, the learners will be directed toward understanding the things that happened in the past and understanding the different utilizations of adjectives and their positioning in sentences. The other essential undertaking involved under the instructional practice is the aspect of a structured practice activity. The facilitator will also take the learners through the process oflistening to things that occurred in the past especially the way an individual spoke to his or her parent. After listening to the incidence or the paragraph, the learners will be required to look at the big picture regarding the words that go along with whatever that took place in the past. In this case, pictures might act as essential guides for the learners to realize whatever that has been happening in the past and they will have to deal with past tenses especially those that describe past events. Output/assessment activity Having every learner use the available materials in creating pictures based on the video that has been viewed or any other undertaking. Monitoring the learners as they work in determining if or not, they are asking questions correctly by using the subject-auxiliary inversion. Closure The learners will be asked to summarize and also synthesize their learning. The essential ways this might be done include sharing what they have learned using the aspect of taking turns and talking. Reference Wynne Wong (2015). The role of textual enhancement and type of linguistic item in Adult L2 learners’ comprehension and intake.
Please use the template for this project I have provided before for the final submission; Also, please use your peer’s feedback effectively to build up your final lesson plan. Notice: Unicheck is used
Comparative Grammar Project and Annotated Lesson Plan-LED 6510 A. INTRODUCTION Your Name: Grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed: Concentration Domain: Title of the lesson: Materials and Digital Tools Needed: Time needed for the lesson: B. LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance: Introductory Statement of Your Language Task: Review of Terminology Annotation C. STANDARDS AND OUTCOMES Standards: Outcomes: D. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE Engaging Students, Activating Prior Knowledge, and Setting Lesson Goals: Instructional Procedure: Engaging Students in Actively Constructing Deep Understanding Incorporating Structured Input Activities Structured Input Activity Annotation: ***Annotate this section by aligning your instructional design choices with appropriate SLA theory. Cite at least one resource in this section. Highlight this annotation in yellow. (Once you have finished, kindly delete the above lines) Structured Practice Activity Annotation: ***Annotate this section by aligning your instructional design choices with appropriate SLA theory. Cite at least one resource in this section. Highlight this annotation in yellow. (Once you have finished, kindly delete the above lines) Output/Assessment Activity Annotation: ***Annotate this section (Section D) by aligning your instructional design choices with appropriate SLA theory. Cite at least one resource in this section. Highlight this annotation in yellow. (Once you have finished, kindly delete the above lines) Closure—Students Summarizing and Synthesizing Their Learning: *** E: REFERENCES: 3
Please use the template for this project I have provided before for the final submission; Also, please use your peer’s feedback effectively to build up your final lesson plan. Notice: Unicheck is used
Comparative Grammar Project and Annotated Lesson Plan For this project, students will create and demonstrate a task-based lesson that includes purposeful and appropriate incorporation of SLA theory into the design process. The framework of this project aligns with the Lesson Planning Framework for Effective Instructional. This assessment further aligns with InTASC standards and may be used for program assessment purposes. You will demonstrate your lesson via peer teaching at the end of the semester and will then be asked to consider your work in a final reflection piece. The final submission of your Annotated Lesson Plan should include the following (adhere to the format below as you organize your work – a template has been provided for you in assignment direction module): A. INTRODUCTION Your Name: Grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed (Elem, Middle, HS, Adult Higher Ed, Adult Other): Concentration Domain (ESL, Bilingual Education, Foreign Language – name the language): Title of the lesson: Materials and Digital Tools Needed (InTASC 7, 8) – all the materials, resources, and technology needed by the students and teacher in order to engage in this lesson: Time needed for the lesson: B. LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT The following four bulleted items should be documented in your plan: Language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance Choose a grammatical element in English (or another language), and compare it against a second language of your choosing. Detail similarities and differences in that grammatical element across the two languages as it relates to form, meaning, and usage. Suggestions for doing this include undertaking formal research, interviewing someone fluent in both languages, consulting grammar reference books, or using your own knowledge of the two languages. Be sure to indicate potential sources of error for learners of the target language, since this element will be the grammatical focus of your lesson plan. Describe how you have witnessed confusion/errors regarding this grammatical element in your own classroom, in the community, and/or how you yourself, as a language learner, have been challenged by it. Introductory Statement of Your Language Task Describe in broad brush the language task you will be focusing on in your lesson and establish relevance by tying your task to the needs/strengths of your students; the cultural/experiential backgrounds of your students; and how you believe this task will be engaging to your students. Specifically, this should not be a literary or cultural task, but should be a relevant communicative task (ex. comparing objects) imbedded within a stated content area instructional task objective (ex. how to safely navigate a chemistry laboratory) if you are a general education teacher with language learning students in your classroom. If you are a second language teacher, you should focus on a real-life communicative task (ex. successful shopping at the grocery store). The communicative task will include your chosen grammatical element from the introduction (e.g. –er + than, smaller than), which will be taught within the context of the lesson (ex. The beakers are taller than the test tubes – or- The canned pineapple is cheaper than the fresh pineapple). Be sure to include what the students (this is potentially a fictional scenario) already know and don’t know as it relates to both the language task and content area objective. Do not explain how you would explain the grammatical rule to students, as explicit instruction should not dominate your lesson. Review of Terminology As you will be considering the needs of your students through the lens of SLA theory, it is important to measure your understanding of theoretical terminology commonly referenced in second language grammar instruction. You are thus required to define the following in your own words: input, output, enhancement, and structured input, practice, and output/assessment activities. Annotation At the bottom of the LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT section, provide an “annotation” that summarizes the SLA theory that has informed your instructional decisions regarding your choice of grammar focus and/or task/content area instructional objective. Highlight this annotated section in yellow. C. STANDARDS AND OUTCOMES Standards: Reference the appropriate link(s) below as you consider standards for your specific lesson plan project: If you are/aspire to be a PK12 general education teacher who has/will have ELLs in the classroom (or if you will be a bilingual education teacher), indicate both content area standards and WIDA English Language Development Standards: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-28753_64839_65510—,00.html https://www.wida.us/DownloadDocs/standards/TheoreticalFramework.pdf If you aspire to be a PK12 foreign language teacher or work abroad with children as an EFL teacher, chose from the following standards: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/WLSB_206824_7.pdf If you have been/aspire to be an EFL/ESL teacher at the adult level, you may use the standards embraced by the specific institution you are employed at or you may use the following standards used in the State of Arizona: http://www.azed.gov/adultedservices/files/2014/01/arizona-adult-education-standards-english-language-acquisition-elaa.pdf Outcomes :Student outcomes should be stated using statements such as: “Students will be able to…” followed by a list of the outcomes written using action verbs that can be observed and/or measured. Use action verbs such as “identify,” “describe,” “compare/contrast,” “apply,” “summarize,” etc. Verbs such as “learn,” “understand,” or “know” might not be adequate because they are not observable or easily measured. For example, an outcome written as “Students will understand the life cycle of a frog” becomes an observable and measureable outcome if written as, “Students will describe the life cycle of a frog in the correct sequence” or “Students will draw the life cycle of a frog in the correct sequence.” List the specific student outcomes that will be met as a result of instructional activities in this plan. There should be at least two outcomes, one specific to the grammar focus and another specific to the task-based focus. D. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE Engaging Students, Activating Prior Knowledge, and Setting Lesson Goals: Drawing on your thinking and planning, describe how you will begin the lesson in a way that interests and engages the students and gets them excited about the lesson. Briefly describe how you will activate your students’ prior knowledge and how you will help them make connections to their world beyond the classroom. Instructional Procedure: Engaging Students in Actively Constructing Deep Understanding Incorporating Structured Input Activities (9 points) The following should be documented in your plan under Instructional Procedure: Structured Input Activity Design a Structured Input Activity appropriate to your lesson. This activity must make the grammatical element salient to the learner and must follow principles discussed in class. Structured Practice Activity You must design a Practice Activity appropriate your lesson. This activity must provide the learner with an opportunity to practice the grammatical element without having to actually produce the grammatical element and should adhere to the principles discussed in class. Output/Assessment Activity You must design an Output/Assessment Activity that fits the context of your lesson. This activity must provide an opportunity to “check understanding” via production of the form in some way. It should follow the principles discussed in class. ***Annotate this section (For all the three activities you have designed respectively in Section D) by aligning your instructional design choices with appropriate SLA theory. Highlight this annotation in yellow. Closure—Students Summarizing and Synthesizing Their Learning: Describe how you will help your students summarize/synthesize the task and how you will connect the lesson to the next and/or future lessons. *** *** Annotations: All annotated material will be scored according to the following (1 point): Annotation indicates understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision is appropriately informed by referenced SLA theory Dates to mark in your calendar 06/12: Lesson Plan Draft is due – post it on Canvas discussion board 06/16: Peer Review 06/20: Final Lesson Plan Due on Canvas
Please use the template for this project I have provided before for the final submission; Also, please use your peer’s feedback effectively to build up your final lesson plan. Notice: Unicheck is used
LED 6510 Comparative Grammar Project and Annotated Lesson Plan Rubric Criteria 0 -4 points 5– 9 points 10–14 points 15 – 19 points 20 points Introduction Introduction part fails to include information to understand the following: grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed; concentration domain, materials and digital tools needed; and time needed for the lesson. Introduction part fails to include information on most of the following: grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed; concentration domain, materials and digital tools needed; and time needed for the lesson Introduction part includes information on the following: grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed; concentration domain, materials and digital tools needed; and time needed for the lesson, yet at least one aspect from above subcategories still need further clarification. Introduction part includes information on the following: grade/age of students for whom the lesson was developed; concentration domain, materials and digital tools needed; and time needed for the lesson, and all the information provided from the above subcategories is complete and well organized. Learners & Learning Environment Discussion on learner & learning environment does not fully address any of the points below: a) language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance b) introductory statement of your language task c) review of terminology Discussion on learner & learning environment includes 1 the following: a) language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance b) introductory statement of your language task c) review of terminology Discussion on learner & learning environment includes 2 of the following: a) language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance b) introductory statement of your language task c) review of terminology Discussion on learner & learning environment includes the 3 following points: a) language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance b) introductory statement of your language task c) review of terminology yet some narrations and descriptions still need further clarifications and explanations. Discussion on learner & learning environment includes information on each of the following: a) language comparison, grammar focus of instruction, and establishment of relevance b) introductory statement of your language task c) review of terminology and all the information provided in the above subcategories is explained clearly. Standards and Outcomes Lesson plan fails to identify standards and outcomes. Lesson plan identifies either standards or outcomes Lesson plan identifies both standards and outcomes The outcomes are described but not explicitly stated and tightly aligned with one another in the lesson plan Lesson plan identifies both standards and outcomes The outcomes still need further explicit statement and the outcomes need further be aligned with one another in the lesson plan Lesson plan identifies both standards and outcomes The outcomes are explicitly stated and tightly aligned with one another in the lesson plan Instructional Practice Lesson plan identifies teaching procedure for the implementation of instructional practice that correspond with 1 of the following components: Engaging students, activate prior knowledge, and setting lesson goals Structured input activity Structured practice activity Output/assessment activity Teaching procedures are described but not clear show how to engage students in actively constructing deep understanding incorporating features of above listed activities. Lesson plan identifies teaching procedure for the implementation of instructional practice that correspond with 2 of the following components: Engaging students, activate prior knowledge, and setting lesson goals Structured input activity Structured practice activity Output/assessment activity Teaching procedures are described but not clear show how to engage students in actively constructing deep understanding incorporating features of above listed activities. Lesson plan identifies teaching procedure for the implementation of instructional practice that correspond with 3 of the following components: Engaging students, activate prior knowledge, and setting lesson goals Structured input activity Structured practice activity Output assessment activity Teaching procedures are described but not clear show how to engage students in actively constructing deep understanding incorporating features of above listed activities. Lesson plan identifies teaching procedure for the implementation of instructional practice that correspond with 4 of the following components: Engaging students, activate prior knowledge, and setting lesson goals Structured input activity Structured practice activity Output assessment activity Teaching procedures still need further clear descriptions and are expected to show more details regarding how to engage students in actively constructing deep understanding incorporating features of above listed activities. Lesson plan identifies teaching procedure for the implementation of instructional practice that correspond with 4 of the following components: Engaging students, activate prior knowledge, and setting lesson goals Structured input activity Structured practice activity Output assessment activity Teaching procedures are described clearly and showing with sufficient details regarding how to engage students in actively constructing deep understanding incorporating features of above listed activities Annotations Lesson plan identifies annotations; and annotations are highlighted in 1 of the following components: LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STRUCTURE INPUT ACTIVITY STRUCTURED PRACTICE ACTIVITY OUTPUT/ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY, PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY Annotation does not indicate understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision does not inform by referenced SLA theory Lesson plan identifies annotations; and annotations are highlighted in 2 of the following components: LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STRUCTURE INPUT ACTIVITY STRUCTURED PRACTICE ACTIVITY OUTPUT/ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY, PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY Annotation indicates little understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision is little informed by referenced SLA theory Lesson plan identifies annotations; and annotations are highlighted in 3 of the following components: 1)LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 2) STRUCTURE INPUT ACTIVITY 3)STRUCTURED PRACTICE ACTIVITY 4)OUTPUT/ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY, 5)PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY Annotation indicates insufficient understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision is insufficiently informed by referenced SLA theory Lesson plan identifies annotations; and annotations are highlighted in 4 of the following components: LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STRUCTURE INPUT ACTIVITY STRUCTURED PRACTICE ACTIVITY OUTPUT/ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY, PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY Annotation indicates understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision is informed by referenced SLA theory Lesson plan identifies annotations; and annotations are clearly highlighted in the following 5 sections: LEARNERS & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STRUCTURE INPUT ACTIVITY STRUCTURED PRACTICE ACTIVITY OUTPUT/ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY, PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY Annotation indicates a very good understanding of referenced SLA theory Instructional decision is appropriately informed by referenced SLA theory




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