Final research proposal paperThe paper is done for the most part it needs to be tweaked a little.
Final research proposal paper The paper is done for the most part it needs to be tweaked a little.
Running head: TECHNOLOGY AND TEEN’S MENTAL HEALTH 0 Technology and Teen’s Mental Health Student Name Institutional Affiliation Date of Submission Participants of the research When I was conducting my research, I focus on how technology impacted teens. Most of the teens in the research were aged between twelve to seventeen years old. The teens were composed of both girls and boys from all races. When I was conducting the research, the economic status varies since some of the teens came from a more financially stable economic status when comparing to other teens. From the evaluation, most of the white teens were more financially stable compared to black teens. When I was researching the participants, most of the teens from more economically stable families had more appealing technological devices that would connect to the internet and tended to focus more on the devices. From the information I collected in the research, most teens below 15 years old tended to focus more on technology than their school work. This made teens with more than 15 years perform better since they focused more on education than technology. (Vincent, 2018) How I recruited my participants for the research. I recruited the teens by visiting their homes for data collection. As I visited their homes, I would begin by socializing with their parents, and later I would request them to allow me to conduct my research to their teens who used technology when learning. Most of them allowed me to conduct it with their teen, but others did not consider it positively since it violated privacy policies. Apart from the teens, I went to a teen psychological counselor who gave me detailed information on how the teens were affected by technology. Why I chose the population for the research. I chose this population since it was the first time for the population to use technology in learning, and it could be vulnerable to technology. When I was conducting the research, I aimed to check the challenges the population would have and implement a possible solution that would be used in helping the population. Part 1, “research design” When I was conducting my research, I used a longitudinal research design. With this method, I set several questions to use when researching my population. Depending on the questions I asked and the responses I got when I was conducting the research, I was able to get a better question that I would ask for the research. With this method, I was able to set simple questions that I would get more information, thus allowing me to get the best suitable answers to facilitate the validity of the research. With the longitudinal research design, I would also set the most essential questions to make the research brief. With this research design, I would also uncover more information regarding the research since I would get more questions depending on the teen’s information. This would allow me to collect more focused data for the research. (Macek, 2017) Part 2, “research procedure” Identifying the research topic Before conducting the research, I had to search for a topic that would match my research. To identify a research topic, I had to review the course materials, search for issues involved between technology fields, and find the people who were mainly impacted by technology. This allowed me to develop a topic as “technology and teen mental health during the pandemic.” Identifying the objectives of the research The main aim of identifying the objectives for the research is that they helped in the process of understanding the target audience for the research. With the objectives, I was able to know what I would be focusing on in the research, and it would allow me to get the possible questions to ask to get the main answer to facilitate the validity of my research. (Reyzenkind, 2017) Identifying the research questions The research questions in the research help provide a map to identify and focus on when I was conducting the research. When I searched for the research questions, I had to set the type of research design to conduct smooth and appealing research to the teen. The research questions were an essential part of the data, and they helped me get the most relevant information that I would use in the research. After I identified the research questions, I went through them to ensure they contained the data I required for my research. Presenting the research questions to the field The goal of presenting the research questions to the field is to collect information that I would use for the research. When presenting the questions to the field, I had to ensure the questions were presentable not to make the interviewee uncomfortable. If the interviewee was uncomfortable, it could be hard for him to answer the question; thus, he would provide me with an invalid answer which would alter the results of the research Analyzing the data collected I conducted data analysis just after I completed conducting the research. Analyzing the data collected allowed me to come with valid results about the research topic. I took more time to make sure all the information collected was in its location before analyzing the research results. After getting the results from the research, I concluded that most of the teen’s mental health was impacted by the technology during the pandemic since they used it for other activities rather than learning. Reference Vincent, B. W. (2018). Studying trans: recommendations for ethical recruitment and collaboration with transgender participants in academic research. Psychology & Sexuality, 9(2), 102-116. Kvitkovičová, L., Umemura, T., & Macek, P. (2017). Roles of attachment relationships in emerging adults’ career decision-making process: A two-year longitudinal research design. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 101, 119-132. Abubakarov, A. G., & Reyzenkind, Y. A. (2017, June). Current state and future development of research procedure of the radar-Absorbing materials based on heterogeneous structures. In 2017 Radiation and Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves (RSEMW) (pp. 161-164). IEEE.
Final research proposal paper The paper is done for the most part it needs to be tweaked a little.
Running head: TECHNOLOGY AND TEENS MENTAL DURING THE PANDEMIC 0 Technology and Teens Mental During the Pandemic Student Name Institutional Affiliation Date of Submission Introduction During the covid-19 pandemic, schools had to be closed, and the teens were to use technology such as smartphones for learning. Instead of using the technology for learning, they used it for various activities that disrupted their running and made the teens vulnerable to various threats. The technology was able to impact the teens both positively and negatively. In this paper, I will discuss how the teens were impacted by technology during the pandemic. (Stager, 2020) Problem statement Due to the covid-19 pandemic, teens were to stay at home and use technology for learning. Despite the teens utilizing technology for learning, they exploited it and started using it for malicious activities such as accessing social media platforms. Instead of technology helping teens to grow mentally, it started deteriorating them. To mitigate this problem, the content displayed to the teens by technology should be monitored by their parents, and inappropriate content should be eliminated. Literature review When the covid-19 pandemic began, teens had to stay away from schools to reduce the spread of the infection. However, by the teens staying at home for long-duration, they seemed to forget a lot regarding the school work, and the government had to search for ways that the teens would be taught. First, there were many suggestions, including half of the students reporting back to school, but it did not seem to be a good plan since half of the students would be left out on what was taught. Secondly, teaching half of the students would make the syllabus lag, which was not the plan. Since teaching half of the students would not be applicable, the government saw that it would be wise to use technology to learn since it was effective and covid-19 would not spread using it. By this, the government also reduced attempts to make the internet available for teens to facilitate learning. In addition, the government took a step toward reducing the rates that were used when subscribing to internet plans. By reducing the cost of the internet plan, the government went ahead and equipped the internet with very appealing learning resources, and the teens would manage to follow them without facing any problems. For the government to allow the teens to access the internet, they were to get help from their parents, who would help them with their smartphones and other electronic devices connected to the internet. Though the teen’s parents were open to giving the teens their electronic devices, the teens did not use the electronic devices for learning, but also they used them for various activities such as using social media platforms, which indirectly impacted them. By the impact of social media platforms, some teens were depressed and could not manage to keep up to their studies as expected. This facilitated worry to the parents of the teens, and they wondered if the technology was helping the teens to learn or it was a vulnerability to them. Most parents who gave teens their smartphones did not appreciate it much since the teens concentrated more on the phone than how the teen concentrated on other activities. On some social media platforms, the teens would build relationships with other people and lose their social skills. This made parents anxious, and they were afraid that technology would mislead the teens rather than teaching them. ( Gladstone, 2018) Research question The main research question that the paper seeks to address is how technology would impact teens and how would it contribute to their social development? Purpose of the study The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate how the technology would affect the teens mentally when they were to learn to use it. In addition, the paper also seeks to examine the threats that teens would face when they used technology in learning. Participants of the research design. For the research to be valid and effective, it was to use various participants who would collect information and analyze them. The main research participants were the digital media platforms that collected and analyzed what teens were doing over the internet, parents, and the psychological professors. Parents were essential in monitoring what their teens did using the technology, and they reported it to the teen’s teacher. On the other side, the psychology professors were essential in the research since they indicated the number of teens whom they had counseled using technology for accessing various platforms for accessing digital media. Measures. From the results of the research, most of the teens were impacted negatively by the technology. Around 35% of the teens ended up losing their social skills. The teens lost their social skills since they spent all the day at home scrolling on their phones, and they could not come out of the house to interact with other people. A population of about 45% of the teens who used technology to learn ended up getting depressed since some received abuses such as being stalked while others would stay up during their bedtime using their phones. A total of 20% could adopt the technology well, and they used it for the intended purpose. Teens who used technology to study were seen performing well than the other teens who used social media to access social media platforms. (Shririn, 2020) Research procedure The research procedure was developed not to alter the privacy policies that the people of our country were provided. To conduct research, we began by politely requesting the parent how his/her teen used technology to learn. By this, the parents would politely give us valuable information that we would use in the research. On the psychology professors and the digital media access, it was not hard since we would collect information from their records on the reported incidents of teens misusing the technology devices. Ethical limitations In the constitution of the United States, the teen had the right to privacy. This made it hard for the researchers to ask what the teen was doing with the smartphone he/she was using. Secondly, when asking what the teen was doing with the technology, he/she would easily lie, becoming an obstacle for the research. Lastly, most of the teens spent most of their time on their smartphones in the bedroom while they were learning. Other teens would be depressed and go to bed, making the parents think that the teen was asleep, which was not correct. Reference Charmaraman, L., Gladstone, T., & Richer, A. (2018). Positive and negative associations between adolescent mental health and technology. In technology and adolescent mental health (pp. 61-71). Springer, Cham. Chassiakos, Y. L. R., & Stager, M. (2020). Current trends in digital media: How and why teens use technology. In Technology and Adolescent Health (pp. 25-56). Academic Press. Shririn, G (2020). The pandemic is raising concerns about how teens use technology. But there’s still a lot we don’t know.
Final research proposal paper The paper is done for the most part it needs to be tweaked a little.
Running head: TECHNOLOGY AND TEENS MENTAL DURING THE PANDEMIC 0 Technology and Teens Mental During the Pandemic Student Name Institutional Affiliation Date of Submission Introduction During the covid-19 pandemic, schools had to be closed, and the teens were to use technology such as smartphones for learning. Instead of using the technology for learning, they used it for various activities that disrupted their running and made the teens vulnerable to various threats. The technology was able to impact the teens both positively and negatively. In this paper, I will discuss how the teens were impacted by technology during the pandemic. (Stager, 2020) Problem statement Due to the covid-19 pandemic, teens were to stay at home and use technology for learning. Despite the teens utilizing technology for learning, they exploited it and started using it for malicious activities such as accessing social media platforms. Instead of technology helping teens to grow mentally, it started deteriorating them. To mitigate this problem, the content displayed to the teens by technology should be monitored by their parents, and inappropriate content should be eliminated. Literature review When the covid-19 pandemic began, teens had to stay away from schools to reduce the spread of the infection. However, by the teens staying at home for long-duration, they seemed to forget a lot regarding the school work, and the government had to search for ways that the teens would be taught. First, there were many suggestions, including half of the students reporting back to school, but it did not seem to be a good plan since half of the students would be left out on what was taught. Secondly, teaching half of the students would make the syllabus lag, which was not the plan. Since teaching half of the students would not be applicable, the government saw that it would be wise to use technology to learn since it was effective and covid-19 would not spread using it. By this, the government also reduced attempts to make the internet available for teens to facilitate learning. In addition, the government took a step toward reducing the rates that were used when subscribing to internet plans. By reducing the cost of the internet plan, the government went ahead and equipped the internet with very appealing learning resources, and the teens would manage to follow them without facing any problems. For the government to allow the teens to access the internet, they were to get help from their parents, who would help them with their smartphones and other electronic devices connected to the internet. Though the teen’s parents were open to giving the teens their electronic devices, the teens did not use the electronic devices for learning, but also they used them for various activities such as using social media platforms, which indirectly impacted them. By the impact of social media platforms, some teens were depressed and could not manage to keep up to their studies as expected. This facilitated worry to the parents of the teens, and they wondered if the technology was helping the teens to learn or it was a vulnerability to them. Most parents who gave teens their smartphones did not appreciate it much since the teens concentrated more on the phone than how the teen concentrated on other activities. On some social media platforms, the teens would build relationships with other people and lose their social skills. This made parents anxious, and they were afraid that technology would mislead the teens rather than teaching them. ( Gladstone, 2018) Research question The main research question that the paper seeks to address is how technology would impact teens and how would it contribute to their social development? Purpose of the study The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate how the technology would affect the teens mentally when they were to learn to use it. In addition, the paper also seeks to examine the threats that teens would face when they used technology in learning. Participants of the research design. For the research to be valid and effective, it was to use various participants who would collect information and analyze them. The main research participants were the digital media platforms that collected and analyzed what teens were doing over the internet, parents, and the psychological professors. Parents were essential in monitoring what their teens did using the technology, and they reported it to the teen’s teacher. On the other side, the psychology professors were essential in the research since they indicated the number of teens whom they had counseled using technology for accessing various platforms for accessing digital media. Measures. From the results of the research, most of the teens were impacted negatively by the technology. Around 35% of the teens ended up losing their social skills. The teens lost their social skills since they spent all the day at home scrolling on their phones, and they could not come out of the house to interact with other people. A population of about 45% of the teens who used technology to learn ended up getting depressed since some received abuses such as being stalked while others would stay up during their bedtime using their phones. A total of 20% could adopt the technology well, and they used it for the intended purpose. Teens who used technology to study were seen performing well than the other teens who used social media to access social media platforms. (Shririn, 2020) Research procedure The research procedure was developed not to alter the privacy policies that the people of our country were provided. To conduct research, we began by politely requesting the parent how his/her teen used technology to learn. By this, the parents would politely give us valuable information that we would use in the research. On the psychology professors and the digital media access, it was not hard since we would collect information from their records on the reported incidents of teens misusing the technology devices. Ethical limitations In the constitution of the United States, the teen had the right to privacy. This made it hard for the researchers to ask what the teen was doing with the smartphone he/she was using. Secondly, when asking what the teen was doing with the technology, he/she would easily lie, becoming an obstacle for the research. Lastly, most of the teens spent most of their time on their smartphones in the bedroom while they were learning. Other teens would be depressed and go to bed, making the parents think that the teen was asleep, which was not correct. Reference Charmaraman, L., Gladstone, T., & Richer, A. (2018). Positive and negative associations between adolescent mental health and technology. In technology and adolescent mental health (pp. 61-71). Springer, Cham. Chassiakos, Y. L. R., & Stager, M. (2020). Current trends in digital media: How and why teens use technology. In Technology and Adolescent Health (pp. 25-56). Academic Press. Shririn, G (2020). The pandemic is raising concerns about how teens use technology. But there’s still a lot we don’t know.
Final research proposal paper The paper is done for the most part it needs to be tweaked a little.
MC IRB Application Form – Initial Review APPLICATION FORM – INITIAL REVIEW INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD Room 117 Main Building 555 Broadway Dobbs Ferry NY 10522 [email protected] MC IRB Protocol No.: Date of IRB Review: For office use only PROJECT TITLE       PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Name (Last, First) Degree(s) Campus Phone Number                   Department Campus Mailing Address Connect/Mercy E-mail Address                   FACULTY SPONSOR Name (Last, First) Degree(s) Campus Phone Number                   Department Campus Mailing Address Mercy E-mail Address                   List all co-investigators below, including those from other institutions STUDENT-INVESTIGATOR Name (Last, First) Phone # Connect E-mail Address                   Mailing Address       STUDENT-INVESTIGATOR Name (Last, First) Phone # Connect E-mail Address                   Mailing Address       STUDENT-INVESTIGATOR Name (Last, First) Phone # Connect E-mail Address                   Mailing Address       STUDENT-INVESTIGATOR Name (Last, First) Phone # Connect E-mail Address                   Mailing Address       Check the proposed research category: Category I (Administrative Review) Email the application packet to [email protected] Category II (Expedited Review) Email the application packet to [email protected] Category III (Full Review) Email the application packet to [email protected] FUNDING SOURCES Check all of the appropriate boxes for funding sources for this research. Include pending funding source(s). Federal Grant Faculty Development Grant Personal Funds Department Gift Commercial – company name:       Other:       If federally funded, provide name and address of individual to whom certification of IRB approval should be sent:       Name       Address line 1       Address line 2       City, State, Zip Attach the research proposal/protocol that was sent to the agency, committee, or sponsor for peer-review of scientific merit if applicable. DATA COLLECTION OR COLLABORATING SITES If the participants are to be recruited from an institution or organization (e.g., hospital, social service agency, prison, school, etc.) or from a privately owned business (private practice, local sports gym, etc.), documentation of permission from the institution must be submitted to the committee before final approval can be given. Letters of permission (on organization’s letterhead) from a senior office of the institution, organization, or business should authorize the investigator(s) to contact potential participants, to use the facilities, or access the records of that entity. If this project is being reviewed by any other human participants research review group (e.g., hospital institutional review board), a copy of the approval of that institutional must be attached or a statement of the status of the review must be noted. List all collaborating and data collection sites Provide certification or letter of IRB approval Provide letters of cooperation or support (as appropriate)       Attached Will follow N/A Attached Will follow N/A       Attached Will follow N/A Attached Will follow N/A Briefly state the problem, the present knowledge relevant to it, and the aims and significance of the proposed research. Cite appropriate literature.       Describe the tasks/tests or procedures participants will be asked to complete. (Suggestions: explain step by step what the participants will be asked to do and distinguish those which are experimental from those which comprise routine clinical care/services.) Attach copies of all questionnaires, testing instruments or interview protocols; include any cover letters or instructions to participants. Provide references on reliability and validity of published tools and written permission to use copyrighted tests if you have not purchased the test.       If participants will come in contact with any mechanical, electrical or other equipment, the form entitled Utilizing Research Equipment with Human Participants must be completed by the investigator and a verified safety check. Description of the Human Participants and the Recruitment Procedures Participant Population Anticipated number: Male       Female       Total       (This number should be the number of participants you will enroll in order to get the adequate data sets you will need. If multiple sites are to be used, provide an estimate of the number in each category to be recruited from each site. In addition, if you plan to study only one sex, provide scientific rationale in the inclusion/exclusion section of the application.) Age Range (check all that apply): 0 – 7 yrs. (submit parental permission form) 8 – 17 yrs. (submit child’s assent form, parental permission form) 18 – 64 yrs. (submit consent form) 65+ yrs. (submit consent form) Source/type of participants: (check all that apply) Mercy College employees Mercy College students inpatients or outpatients Community volunteers other: specify       State any relationship (past or present) the researcher may have with the potential participants:       Location of participants during research data collection (check all that apply): Participant’s home Mercy College locations: specify       Local hospitals: specify       community settings: specify       other institutions: specify       elementary schools: specify       secondary schools: specify       other: specify       Describe populations to be excluded from the research. Please describe procedures to assure equitable selection of participants. Researchers should not select participants on the basis of discriminatory criteria. Selection criteria that exclude one sex, racial, or ethnic group require a clear scientific rationale for the exclusion.       Special populations to be included in the research (check all that apply): minors under age 18 pregnant women fetus/fetal tissue prisoners economically disadvantaged other: specify       Provide rationale for using special populations. The groups listed in (f) above are considered “vulnerable” or require special consideration by the federal regulatory agencies and by the IRB.       Recruitment Procedures Describe how participants will be identified and recruited. Attach all recruitment information, e.g., advertisements, bulletin board notices, and recruitment letters for all types of media (printed, radio, email, electronic, TV, or Internet).       Initial Contact. Describe who will make initial contact. How? If participants are chosen from records, indicate who gave approval for the use of the records. If records are “private” medical or student records, provide the protocol, consent forms, letters, etc., for securing consent of the participants for the records. Written documentation for cooperation/permission from the holder or custodian of the records should be attached. (Initial contact of participants identified through a records search must be made by the official holder of the record, i.e. primary physician, therapist, public school official.)       List criteria for inclusion and exclusion of participants in this study. Inclusion:       Exclusion:       How will the inclusion/exclusion criteria be assessed and by whom?       Will participants receive incentives before or rewards after the study (e.g., academic credit, money)? If yes, explain. (Note: this information must be outlined in the consent document.) Yes No       Will the participants be charged for research-related procedures? For example, will participants be charged for extra tests/services related to the research? If yes, explain charges, including estimated amounts. Will there be financial coverage for the extra costs? If yes, explain. (Note: this information must be included in the consent document.) Yes No       Risks and Benefits of the Research Identify the risks (current and potential) and describe the expected frequency, degree of severity, and potential reversibility. Include any potential late effects. (Note: risks can be psychological, physical, social, economic, or legal.)       Does the research involve (check all that apply): administration of drugs, and chemical or biological agents administration of physical stimuli changes in diet or exercise use of private records (medical or educational records) possible invasion of privacy of participant or family deprivation of physiological requirements such as nutrition or sleep manipulation of psychological or social variables such as sensory deprivation, social isolation, psychological stresses the collection of personal or sensitive information in surveys or interviews use of a deceptive technique (If use of deception is part of the experimental protocol, the protocol must include a “debriefing procedure” [provide this procedure for IRB review] which will be followed upon completion of the study, or withdrawal of the participants.) presentation of materials that participants might consider offensive, threatening, or degrading other risks: specify       Describe the precautions taken to minimize risk:       Care of participants in case of an accident: Describe the provisions that have been made for the care of the participant in the event of an accident or complication related to the research procedures. (Note: This section may not apply to Category I or II research. Also, unless specific sponsored contracts exist to cover research-related injuries, the standard treatment compensation language must be included in the consent form [see sample].)       Why are the risks and inconveniences mentioned above reasonable? What is the expected scientific yield from the project? Please justify the risks in relation to the anticipated benefits to the participants and in relation to the importance of the knowledge that may reasonably be expected to result from the research.       Benefits of participation: List any anticipated direct benefits of participation in this research project. If none, state that fact here and in the consent form. The knowledge gained from the study could produce a benefit to society. Payment is not considered to be a benefit of participation. Any benefits of treatment should be listed as potential benefits.       Confidentiality of Data Describe provisions made to maintain confidentiality of data. How will the data be coded? Who will have access to raw data? Will raw data be made available to anyone other than the Principal Investigator and immediate study personnel (e.g., school officials, medical personnel)? If yes, who, how, and why? Describe the procedure for sharing data. Describe how the participant will be informed that the data may be shared.       Where will the data be kept and for how long? How will audio and video tapes be disposed of? (Disposition of audio and video tapes should be included in consent form.)       Will the research data and information be part of the medical chart, academic record, or other permanent record? (Explain here and in the consent form.) Yes No       Informed Consent Process Simply giving a consent form to a participant does not constitute informed consent. The following questions pertain to the process. Researchers are cautioned that consent forms should be written in simple declarative sentences. The forms should be jargon-free. Foreign language versions should be prepared for any applicable research. Capacity to consent. Will all adult participants have the capacity to give informed consent? Yes No If not, describe the likely range of impairment and explain how, and by whom, their capacity to consent will be determined. Note: In research involving more than minimal risk, capacity to consent should be determined by a psychiatrist, clinical psychologist, or other qualified professional not otherwise involved in the research. Individuals who lack the capacity to consent may participate in research only if a legally authorized representative gives consent on their behalf.       Is the informed consent document attached? Yes No See MC IRB website for informed consent information: http://www.mercy.edu/stafffaculty/irb/sampleconsent.htm If you are using telephone surveys, telephone scripts are required.       How will participants’ understanding be assessed? What questions will be asked to assess the participants’ understanding; will there be written responses; will understanding be assessed at other points in time? (Note: the purpose of this question is to ask you to describe how you will assess participants’ understanding of the consent process. Questions requiring “yes/no” answers do not do that very well. Please ask participants to explain the purpose of the study to you along with the risks and benefits to themselves as participants. Their answers to these questions should allow you to determine if they understand the study and their part in it. If they do not understand, informed consent has not been achieved even if the participant signed the consent document.)       In relation to the actual data gathering, when and where will consent be discussed and documentation obtained, for example, immediately prior to the data collection or several days before? Be specific.       Will the investigator(s) be securing all of the informed consents? Yes No If no, name the specific individuals who will obtain informed consent and include their job title and a brief description of your plans to train these individuals to obtain consent and answer participants’ questions.       Are you requesting Waiver or Alteration of Informed Consent? Yes No An IRB may approve a consent which does not include, or alters, some or all of the elements of informed consent (e.g., oral consent). Provide justifications for the following questions for requesting a waiver of written informed consent. Why does the proposed research present no more than minimal risk to the participants?       Why will a waiver of informed consent not adversely affect the rights and welfare of participants?       Why is it impracticable to carry out the research without a waiver or alteration of informed consent?       How will pertinent information be provided to the participants, if appropriate, at a later date?       Even if waiver of written informed consent is granted, you may be required to obtain verbal permission which reflects elements of the written consent (if appropriate). Please specify below the information to be read/given to the research participants.       Investigator Training 1. Describe the investigator(s) training and experience to conduct the research (e.g., training and experience). Include a copy of certificate demonstrating completion of the NIH Computer Based Training Program (required for all key personnel in the research project).       INVESTIGATOR’S ASSURANCE I certify that the information provided in this application is complete and correct. I understand that as Principal Investigator, I have ultimate responsibility for the protection of the rights and welfare of human participants, conduct of the study and the ethical performance of the project. I agree to comply with all Mercy College policies and procedures, as well as with all applicable federal, state and local laws regarding the protection of human participants in research, including, but not limited to, the following: The project will be performed by qualified personnel according to the MC IRB certified protocol, No changes will be made in the protocol or consent form until approved by the MC IRB, Legally effective informed consent will be obtained from human participants if applicable, and Adverse events will be reported to the MC IRB in a timely manner. I have completed the required educational program on ethical principles and regulatory requirements. I further certify that the proposed research is not currently underway and will not begin until approval has been obtained. ______________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________ Principal Investigator Date FACULTY SPONSOR’S ASSURANCE By my signature as sponsor on this research application, I certify that the student or guest investigator is knowledgeable about the regulations and policies governing research with human participants and has sufficient training and experience to conduct this particular study in accord with the approved protocol. In addition, I agree to meet with the investigator on a regular basis to monitor study progress, Should problems arise during the course of the study, I agree to be available, personally, to supervise the investigator in solving them, I insure that the investigator will promptly report significant or untoward adverse effects to the MC IRB in a timely manner, If I will be unavailable, as when on sabbatical leave or vacation, I will arrange for an alternate faculty sponsor to assume responsibility during my absence and I will advise the MC IRB by letter of such arrangements, and I have insured that the investigator completed the required educational program on ethical principles and regulatory requirements. I further certify that the proposed research is not currently underway and will not begin until approval has been obtained. ______________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________ Faculty Sponsor* (if PI is a student or a fellow) Date *The faculty sponsor must be a member of the MC faculty. The faculty member is considered the responsible party for legal and ethical performance of the project. Page 19 of 12




Why Choose Us

  • 100% non-plagiarized Papers
  • 24/7 /365 Service Available
  • Affordable Prices
  • Any Paper, Urgency, and Subject
  • Will complete your papers in 6 hours
  • On-time Delivery
  • Money-back and Privacy guarantees
  • Unlimited Amendments upon request
  • Satisfaction guarantee

How it Works

  • Click on the “Place Order” tab at the top menu or “Order Now” icon at the bottom and a new page will appear with an order form to be filled.
  • Fill in your paper’s requirements in the "PAPER DETAILS" section.
  • Fill in your paper’s academic level, deadline, and the required number of pages from the drop-down menus.
  • Click “CREATE ACCOUNT & SIGN IN” to enter your registration details and get an account with us for record-keeping and then, click on “PROCEED TO CHECKOUT” at the bottom of the page.
  • From there, the payment sections will show, follow the guided payment process and your order will be available for our writing team to work on it.